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Parkinson's Australia National Symposium - Prosper 2020
Parkinson's Australia National Symposium 'Prosper' 2020
Parkinson's Australia National Symposium - Prosper 2020
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Alison Stoker

Program Manager Chronic Disease - Western NSW Primary Health Network
Professional Bio
Alison has lived and worked as a registered nurse in Western NSW since moving from Sydney in 1992 to a remote property in the north west of the state. Alison completed her nursing and midwifery qualifications before departing Sydney and a Graduate Certificate in Child and Family Health (Karitane), Graduate Certificate in Advance Nursing Rural and Remote and Immunisation Certificate by distance learning whilst educating four daughters at home on distance education using both radio and satellite technologies. 

Working at Warren Multi-Purpose Health Service for 26 years Alison always had a clinical component to positions; registered nurse and certified midwife acute care and emergency, child and family health nurse, community nurse, ACAT assessor, NUM Aged Care, Nurse Manager and acting Health Service Manager. Since working for Western NSW Primary Health Network Alison has undertaken the role as Palliative Approach Project Manager and now Program Manager Chronic Disease. 

Alison has firsthand experience of the impact of rurality and remoteness on health outcomes and a strong understanding of the health needs and gaps in small rural communities and the strength and resilience of these communities. Registered Nurses that live in these rural and remote communities often travel large distances to work, juggle family life and rural properties or businesses with their partners as well as undertake many volunteer community positions. Assisting in upskilling these resilient members of the health workforce for better outcomes in our communities is paramount. 

Alison's PresentationsView Program

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